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Author Topic: Women in aviation  (Read 24330 times)

Offline AVIATOR

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Re: Women and aviation
« Reply #12 on: June 20, 2009, 03:22:40 AM »
I always book my flights with a platinum airline credit card. Check out the benefits.


Offline AVIATOR

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Re: Women and aviation
« Reply #13 on: June 20, 2009, 11:03:11 AM »
El, Viggen's topic isn't "women in the military", it's  "women in aviation". That means all aviation including civil and doesn't mean just pilots. It means any woman connected to aviation. Flight attendants, lady aviation mechanics, even a desk clerk in an airline office.

« Last Edit: June 21, 2009, 06:06:20 AM by AVIATOR »

Offline Eldorado82

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Re: Women and aviation
« Reply #14 on: June 20, 2009, 11:09:42 AM »
they are soldiers because they its army cantina..but anyways if you want to be that strict then its ok
Remembering Steven "TigerShark" Zeluff

Offline AVIATOR

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Re: Women and aviation
« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2009, 11:21:20 AM »
No worries El mate. Whatever!

Offline AVIATOR

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Re: Women in aviation
« Reply #16 on: June 26, 2009, 09:57:14 AM »
Check out the attire on this flight attendant on a hot flight in a Fokker 100 from Karratha to Perth.
Note the emergency exits and then make sure your tray tables are upright before you do yourself an injury.
Nice skirt.

« Last Edit: June 26, 2009, 10:46:50 AM by AVIATOR »

Offline AVIATOR

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Re: Women in aviation
« Reply #17 on: June 27, 2009, 03:21:41 AM »
Japan Airlines [JAL] is about to become the leading airline in the world as thousands of male passengers change their bookings and future flights.



Following the latest fashion trends in Japan, JAP will be introducing new uniforms to comply with current trends in culture at home.






Qantas, who are stuck with 55 year old female cabin crew dragons have cried foul and are expected to file suit shortly.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2009, 11:25:09 AM by AVIATOR »

Offline Viggen

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Re: Women in aviation
« Reply #18 on: June 27, 2009, 03:57:48 PM »
Hi Aviator!

Nice images, but try to keep the nudity to a minimum please. Remember that we also have young members.  ;)
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Offline AVIATOR

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Re: Women in aviation
« Reply #19 on: June 28, 2009, 01:43:00 AM »
Yeah OK Viggen, but it wasn't my fault, Shawn told me to do it. I cut it back to just one photo.

Offline Viggen

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Re: Women in aviation
« Reply #20 on: June 28, 2009, 03:39:00 PM »
Its ok. I just thought i would remind you before anything more hardcore turns up. LOL!  ;D  I know how easy it is to get a bit carried away, done that mistake a couple of times myself.  :)
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Offline Viggen

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Re: Women in aviation
« Reply #21 on: June 28, 2009, 03:43:50 PM »
In poker this might be a winning hand.  ;D


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Offline AVIATOR

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Women in aviation AMY JOHNSON
« Reply #22 on: July 01, 2009, 02:19:17 AM »

The early aviation achievements of Amy Johnson


Early in 1930, she chose her objective: to fly solo to Australia and to beat Bert Hinkler's record of 16 days.

Amy set off alone in a single engine Gypsy Moth from Croydon on May 5, 1930, and landed in Darwin on May 24, an epic flight of 11,000 miles. She was the first woman to fly alone to Australia.

In July 1931, she set an England to Japan record in a Puss Moth with Jack Humphreys. In July 1932, she set a record from England to Capetown, solo, in a Puss Moth. In May, 1936, she set a record from England to Capetown, solo, in a Percival Gull, a flight to retrieve her 1932 record.

With her husband, Jim Mollison, she also flew in a DH Dragon non-stop from Pendine Sands, South Wales, to the United States in 1933. They also flew non-stop in record time to India in 1934 in a DH Comet in the England to Australia air race.

After her commercial flying ended with the outbreak of World War II in 1939, Amy joined the Air Transport Auxiliary, a pool of experienced pilots who were ineligible for RAF service. Her flying duties consisted of ferrying aircraft from factory airstrips to RAF bases.

It was on one of these routine flights on January 5, 1941, that Amy crashed into the Thames estuary and was drowned, a tragic and early end to the life of Britain's most famous woman pilot.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2009, 11:25:48 AM by AVIATOR »

Offline Viggen

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Re: Women in aviation
« Reply #23 on: July 01, 2009, 06:34:18 PM »
Great post Aviator. It was a real intresting read.  :)
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