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Author Topic: South American Arms Race  (Read 51545 times)

Offline SAS73

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Re: South American Arms Race
« Reply #24 on: August 27, 2008, 10:21:07 AM »
well thats very good news for the Peru Air Force, finally.....

Offline SAS73

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Re: South American Arms Race
« Reply #25 on: August 28, 2008, 01:40:41 AM »
Well, well what I have here, there is a crecient rumor that Colombia bought 12 F-16 MLU. there is a  Magazine Called "seguridad y defensa" that brought bye this rumor. Is it true? mmm, what will say Ecuador and Venezuela about this?

Offline SAS73

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Re: South American Arms Race
« Reply #26 on: September 08, 2008, 11:52:39 PM »
Russian Navy to set exercises near Venesuela coast

Sept. 4 Venesuela's Navy HQ told about joint exercises with Russian Navy in Venesuela's territorial waters in Nov. 10-14. From Russian side there will be 4 ships and 1000 servicemen.

In Russian
http://lenta.ru/news/2008/09/07/maneuvres/

Offline tigershark

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Re: South American Arms Race
« Reply #27 on: September 09, 2008, 02:24:37 AM »
The Viper rumor is interesting but you know the Israeli have a few Vipers to sell you know too.  The Israeli designed their own type of MLU upgrade called "ACE" using a Israeli made radar and weapons systems.  I'm sure weapons on the Kfir's could be shared on both and would give your AF a upgrade in power and tech.   Just my two cents but some how some way Colombia needs to get some Vipers either from Israel, US, Holland, I don't care where.  Once those F-35s start rolling out or even in the heavy testing stages Vipers will become available in numbers.  Countries will want to unload them maybe even C/D models as well one never knows.  Look up the ACE upgrade program its good reading.

Offline SAS73

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Re: South American Arms Race
« Reply #28 on: September 10, 2008, 09:35:36 PM »
Yeah I agree with you the IAF vipers will be a good choice for the Colombian Air Force, any model will be welcome to face the Sukhoi threat from venezuela.

here is more news from the continent

2 Russian strategic bombers land in Venezuela

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MOSCOW (AP) — The Interfax news agency is quoting Russia's Defense Ministry as saying that two Russian strategic bombers have landed in Venezuela as part of military maneuvers.Interfax quoted the ministry as saying in a statement that the two Tu-160 strategic bombers landed in Venezuela on Wednesday. The ministry said the planes will conduct training flights over neutral waters over the next few days before heading back to Russia.

http://rian.ru/defense_safety/20080910/151159870.html

Offline tigershark

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Re: South American Arms Race
« Reply #29 on: September 11, 2008, 12:07:38 AM »
I'll post the article in English in the news section thanks for finding it.  I don't make much with the bombers issues there not much of threat and I'm always glad for the pilots that the aircraft made it.   

Offline SAS73

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Re: South American Arms Race
« Reply #30 on: September 16, 2008, 06:28:10 AM »
well and now we are witness of the visit of two Tu-160 Russian Air Force Heavy Bombers in Venezuela. This weekend they perform a 6 hours flight drills in venezuela and caribbean air space with the Venezuelan Air Force. How long they will stay there? who knows? becuase until november of this year the Russian Fleet will arrive to Venezuela to perform military exersices along side the Venezuelan Naval Forces. All of this in front of US Naval Forces and Nato forces representing by the Dutchs in Aruba, Curazao and Bonaire. the Russian Air Force said that they werent armed with nuclear weapons. Could be all of this a representation of Power by Mr. Chavez or the Russians after what happened in Gerogia? Could all of this the new cold war?

Offline tigershark

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Re: South American Arms Race
« Reply #31 on: September 19, 2008, 03:40:23 AM »
SAS73 do people in your country follow items like this closely in the press or things involving Chavez become routine?

Some general South American news

Bolivian political clashes spark diplomatic crisis


By CARLOS VALDEZ, Associated Press WriterFri Sep 12, 7:21 AM ET

Violent clashes over this fractured nation's political future have claimed eight lives and unleashed a diplomatic crisis, with Bolivia and the U.S. expelling each other's ambassadors.

Venezuela, meanwhile, kicked out its top U.S. diplomat and the South American allies demanded that Washington stay out of their affairs.

Anti-government protesters fought backers of President Evo Morales in Bolivia's pro-autonomy east with clubs, machetes and guns Thursday, killing at least eight people and injuring 20, authorities reported.

The demonstrators also seized natural gas fields, halting half of Bolivia's gas exports to Brazil, its No. 1 customer, for nearly seven hours, according to the affected Transierra pipeline company.

"We're going to tolerate only so much. Patience has its limits," Morales told supporters on Thursday. The Aymara Indian and former coca growers' union leader has so far hesitated to mobilize the military, fearing major bloodshed.

Vice President Alvaro Garcia announced a day of national mourning.

Meanwhile, U.S. officials angered by Morales' decision to expel Washington's ambassador for allegedly inciting opposition protesters responded Thursday by kicking out Bolivia's envoy to the United States.

"In response to unwarranted actions and in accordance with the Vienna Convention (on diplomatic protocol), we have officially informed the government of Bolivia of our decision to declare Ambassador Gustavo Guzman persona non grata," State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said. Diplomats declared "persona non grata" are generally given 72 hours to depart.

Earlier on Thursday, Bolivian Foreign Minister David Choquehuanca told reporters that he had requested U.S. Ambassador Philip Goldberg's expulsion but added that he also wrote Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to say Bolivia "wishes to maintain bilateral relations."

Morales had accused Goldberg of conspiring with Bolivia's conservative opposition. Goldberg met last week with Santa Cruz Gov. Ruben Costas, one of the Bolivian president's most virulent opponents.

In Venezuela, President Hugo Chavez, in a show of solidarity with his ally Morales, gave the U.S. ambassador to his country, Patrick Duddy, 72 hours to leave and announced the recall of Venezuela's ambassador to Washington.

Chavez also once again accused the United States of backing a coup to overthrow him, a claim the U.S. has repeatedly denied.

"That's enough ... from you, Yankees," Chavez said during a televised rally, using an expletive. Waving his fists in the air, he added: "I hold the government of the United States responsible for being behind all the conspiracies against our nations!"

The conflict in Bolivia centers on Morales' plans to redo the constitution and redirect gas revenues. Bolivia's conservative, energy-rich eastern provinces oppose those plans, and on Thursday two weeks of protests turned violent as demonstrators stormed public offices, blocked roads and seized the gas fields.

Eight people were killed in a clash between pro- and anti-government bands outside Cobija, capital of the eastern province of Pando, said Sacha Llorenti, a deputy minister for social movements.

Presidential spokeswoman Nancy Teixera said at least 20 people were injured. Radio reports said the groups fought with clubs, machetes and shotguns. Interior Minister Alfredo Rada confirmed the use of firearms.

The protests forced the closure of various regional airports, and American Airlines canceled all flights to Bolivia. Company spokeswoman Martha Pantin said it expected flights to resume beginning Sunday.

Bolivia's finance minister, meanwhile, said gas deliveries to Brazil would be curtailed by 10 percent for up to two weeks as workers fix a pipeline ruptured by protesters on Wednesday. Bolivia supplies Brazil with 50 percent of its natural gas.

Brazilian state energy company Petrobras said it has adopted a contingency plan to decrease natural gas use in its units and replace gas with other fuels.

Protesters also stormed Bolivia's Pocitos gas installation, which supplies neighboring Argentina. Plant technicians shut off gas to the country as a precautionary measure, an engineer at Pocitos told The Associated Press.

An executive with Transportadora Gas del Norte, the Argentine pipeline company that receives the Bolivian gas, said the gas flow was unaffected, however.

Both officials spoke on condition of anonymity, saying they were not authorized to comment on the matter.

Opposition groups also are demanding that Morales cancel a Dec. 7 nationwide vote on a new constitution that would help him centralize power, run for a second consecutive term and transfer fallow terrain to landless peasants from Bolivia's poor indigenous majority.

A top aide to Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva said high-ranking members of his government and that of Argentina are ready to go to Bolivia to try to negotiate a deal between Morales and his opponents.

Also on Thursday, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega announced his support for Bolivia's decision to expel Goldberg, while Chavez threatened military intervention if Morales were to be overthrown.

"It would give us a green light to begin whatever operations are necessary to restore the people's power," he said.

____

Associated Press writers Marco Sibaja in Brasilia, Brazil; Bradley Brooks in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Alan Clendenning in Sao Paulo, Brazil; Frank Bajak in Bogota, Colombia; Ian James in Caracas, Venezuela; and Matthew Lee in Washington contributed to this report.

Source
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080912/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/bolivia_us_venezuela&printer=1;_ylt=Aio5iFSwXZm4WHfCgaTnxcu9IxIF

Offline SAS73

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Re: South American Arms Race
« Reply #32 on: September 19, 2008, 09:09:38 AM »
Nonpilot, yes this topic about the Diplomatic crisis between Bolivia, Venezueal and the US was a huge topic Here. Specially when MR Chavez said to the Americans Go to Sh*********t to hell and expell american ambassador in venezuela. jajaja he got  enough balls to said that. Here there was a relative worried situation about the visit of the two Tu-160 russian Bombers. But as far as I know they left Venezuela this week. We have to wait what will happen in November when the two Navy of Venezuela and Russia will perform military drills on the Caribbean Sea. Chavez and Uribe met together on monday in Santiago de Chile, and Chavez said that Uribe wasn´t to worry about the visit of the two russian bombers. any way Uribe is in Washington and New York this week to discuss the Free Trade. I hope Uribe advisors and Pentagon Advisors will help the Colombian Air Force to obtain some F-16. there are many rumors that Colombia is looking forward to obtain second hand used F-16´s; From Belguim, Israel and why not USA.
Remember the rumor about  Colombia was for looking to buy  Sweden´s Gripens 4th generation jet fighter?
they stay there, but Colombia will aqcuire a RADAR or AWACK plataform from SAAB mounted in an
EMBRAER 145 aircraft.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2008, 12:29:54 PM by SAS73 »

Offline SAS73

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Re: South American Arms Race
« Reply #33 on: October 03, 2008, 12:50:45 PM »
Rafale, Gripen NG and Super Hornet short listed in Brazils F-X2

F-16BR, Eurofighter and Suckhoi 35 didn't make the cut.

Rafale should win... unless they need even lower operating costs then Gripen NG is a good bet. I don't think the USA will be able to offer as much technology as Brazil wants so I list it as the 3rd choice.

(if you read Portuguese)


http://www.estadao.com.br/nacional/not_nac251435,0.htm

Offline tigershark

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Re: South American Arms Race
« Reply #34 on: October 04, 2008, 01:30:15 AM »
I changed my mind a few times already but I'm going with:

Gripen
Hornet
Rafale

Offline SAS73

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Re: South American Arms Race
« Reply #35 on: October 06, 2008, 10:41:55 AM »
Russia's warships head for exercise with Venezuelan navy

October 6, 2008

Russia displayed its military strength in the Mediterranean yesterday after warships heading to Venezuela passed through the Strait of Gibraltar in the second deployment of Russian naval vessels in the waterway since the Cold War.

The nuclear-powered missile cruiser Peter the Great, accompanied by the Admiral Chabanenko, an anti-submarine destroyer, as well as a reconnaissance vessel and a support ship, are destined for a maritime exercise with the Venezuelan navy.

En route, however, the aim appears to be to demonstrate to the West and Nato that Russia is once again back in business as a blue-water power.

“It's all about strutting your stuff and cocking a snook at the West, in the same way that the Bears [Russian strategic bombers] have been doing since they began patrolling again,” said Andrew Brookes, of the London-based International Institute for Strategic Studies.

Jason Alderwick, naval analyst at the institute, said that the Russian warships, which set off from their base at Severomorsk, near Murmansk on the Arctic coast, were Cold War “legacy ships”, not the modern vessels deployed by Western navies with advanced communications and surveillance systems.

“This is a case of naval diplomacy rather than a demonstration of capability,” he said.

Mr Alderwick said that the only other occasion since the Cold War when Russian warships had passed through the Strait — coming within a few miles of the strategically important British naval base — was last year, when Russia's sole aircraft carrier, the Admiral Kuznetsov, and five other ships were deployed from Severomorsk.

The dispatching of the Peter the Great was a significant event, he said, particularly because Moscow had clearly decided to make its presence felt in the Mediterranean before engaging with the Venezuelan navy during the exercise.

The Russian naval force is due to call at the Libyan port of Tripoli and the Syrian port of Tartus, which played host to Soviet ships during the Cold War.

Reports suggested that the warships may have made a stop-off in Tartus, but this was not confirmed by Moscow.

The flotilla may also visit the Syrian port of Latakia, where the Russians are helping to build a new facility. The arrival of the four Russian warships in the Mediterranean comes after Moscow's military operation in Georgia.
After the defeat of Georgia in August, Moscow made it clear that it intended to deploy its military on regular manoeuvres around the world.
It has also moved to intensify contacts with Venezuela, Cuba and other Latin American countries. Russia has signed weapons contracts worth more than $4 billion with Venezuela since 2005 to supply fighter jets, helicopters and 100,000 Kalashnikov AK47 assault rifles.

Despite the new muscular approach, there was evidence yesterday of Russian withdrawals from Georgia. Russian troops began dismantling checkpoints in the “security zones” they have occupied in Georgia since the brief war in the former Soviet republic.

Russia is supposed to be pulling back its troops under the terms of a deal brokered by President Sarkozy of France on behalf of the European Union. Moscow has said that it still plans to keep thousands of troops inside the two breakaway regions of Georgia — South Ossetia and Abkhazia. Russia has formally recognised the independence of both regions. 

Source:http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle4887728.ece


 



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