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Author Topic: "Rhino Beetle" has a problem  (Read 6629 times)

Offline shawn a

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"Rhino Beetle" has a problem
« on: October 13, 2011, 08:49:55 AM »
I'm sure Lockheed wishes it's rhino beetle could land just about anywhere, like the insect, but hot and powerful exhaust may preclude that capability except on specially prepared surfaces.
According to an article in the October issue of DTI (Defense Technology International), statements from Lockheed and the Navy conflicted with Navy documents about the temperature of the exhaust. Statements that the cruise/lift nozzle exhaust was "18 degrees hotter than a Harrier", and "...the difference between the F-35B main engine exhaust temperature and that of the AV-8B is very small" were at odds with a Navy document stating the nozzle temperature is 400 degrees hotter than that of a Harrier, and twice the typical Harrier ground temperature.
The difference alone (400 degrees fahrenheit) is just perfect to bake a pizza. Naval Facilities Engineering Command documents expect a 50% probability of standard airfield concrete "spalling" on the first vertical landing. (Spalling is a fancy term for exploding)
So much for "austere/improvised surfaces" as landing fields.

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Re: "Rhino Beetle" has a problem
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2011, 05:32:50 AM »
meh, I dunno, too vague.

it's probably kept from improvised landing spots anyway because aerial warfare changed and prevention of damage to its stealthy skin. It's not really a Harrier replacement, it's a way to put the F-35 on green water carriers. All that matters is can you land it on small carriers... I don't think the above will be a problem. They have fixed landing spots.

And with regards to airfields, just land normally.
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Re: "Rhino Beetle" has a problem
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2011, 02:42:33 AM »
Pratt & Whitney F135 Propulsion System Powers Successful Sea Trials for F-35 Program
http://www.pw.utc.com/media_center/press_releases/2011/11_nov/11-9-2011_00002.asp

So I guess, the USN has some real numbers to work with now... right? Or is this temperature debate something that's not covered by the trials?
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Offline shawn a

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Re: "Rhino Beetle" has a problem
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2011, 09:45:53 PM »
Wouldn't it be interesting if GE could prove that the F-136 engine was significantly cooler than the Pratt F-135?
I think I read somewhere that Pratt&Whitney engines are usually hotter in the core sections than other engines.

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Re: "Rhino Beetle" has a problem
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2011, 12:39:05 PM »
Hmm, going for 3k lbf more ánd cooler... idk. But core is not really the issue here.
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Offline shawn a

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Re: "Rhino Beetle" has a problem
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2011, 08:37:06 PM »
To my simple mind, cooler core should mean cooler exhaust.
Wouldn't it be something if GE could demonstrate a cooler and less destructive exhaust?
Us Marine Corps are rumored to be investigating a Harrier buy from the Brits.

 



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